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NF1 research award first
for UK consultant

13 July 2018

Dr Shruti Garg, consultant in child & adolescent psychiatry at Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital is the first non-US resident to receive Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) $555,000 research award.

The Francis S. Collins Scholars Award in Neurofibromatosis Clinical and Translational Research was established by the John Hopkins University School of Medicine in 2014. The purpose of the award is to create a community of exceptionally well-trained clinician-scientists committed to the research and clinical care of patients with NF1.

Run by the Neurofibromatosis Therapeutic Acceleration Program (NTAP), Collins Scholars are seen as the next generation of leaders. They are selected for their potential to inspire and train others, as well drive the discovery of treatment for NF1 and its many manifestations.

Dr Garg said of her award: “It is a great honour to have been awarded The Francis S. Collins Scholars Award. This award will advance our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive deficits in NF1 and whether a type of treatment known as transcranial direct current stimulation may be helpful in treating these learning impairments.”
As part of the scholarship Dr Garg will receive full salary support for three years, plus contributions towards the costs of research, coursework, conference travel and mentorship. The program also provides a curriculum focused on translational science, a research community that offers hands-on support, and the opportunity to participate in collaborative translational research programs with government, academic and industry partners.

Scholars are chosen based on their professional history, career development plan, research project, mentorship plan and demonstrated excellence to date. Each scholar brings a unique skill set and diversity of experience and the two new scholars this year join a group of seven.

https://research.cmft.nhs.uk/news-events/dr-shruti-garg-receives-international-award-to-support-neurofibromatosis-type-1-research